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Does getting to dress casually make freelancers more productive?

Paystream News

Paystream

Wednesday 11th Jan, 2017

Freelancers and limited company contractors who have the perk of choosing to wear casual clothes or even their pyjamas to work may be more likely to be productive than their office-based counterparts who have to adhere to strict dress codes.

This is one of the suggestions of the results of a new study carried out by Stormline, which found that almost two-thirds (61 per cent) of UK workers feel they can get more work done when they feel relaxed and comfortable in what they are wearing.

Therefore, this indicates that contractors, freelancers and others who work from home could be getting more done than office workers due to feeling significantly more comfortable.

Of course, contractors operating in some industries will have to dress in a certain way to meet health and safety requirements or to appear professional when talking to clients, but survey respondents still wanted a certain degree of control over what they could and couldn't wear to work.

In total, 19 per cent of women and 12 per cent of men wanted their piercings to be accepted by the companies that they worked for, while 17 per cent of male respondents and ten per cent of the females questioned also didn't want a client to have a negative impression of them due to their tattoos.

Regan McMillan, director of Stormline, commented: "Businesses in the UK still seem oddly keen on making their talent dress in specific, often very restrictive ways.

"Our research suggests that this sort of attitude could actually be harming businesses and their ability to attract the top talent."

This therefore indicates that clients taking on contractors or freelancers on a short-term basis need to be more open-minded about their appearance and not let it detract from the potential value the worker could add to their organisation, particularly in the midst of the ongoing skills shortage.

Instead, clients should be placing a greater focus on the skills, knowledge and expertise that contractors have and not judging their ability based on how they are dressed.